Chapter 34. Regulatory and Research Methods Used by the U.S. FDA for Determination of Lead in Ceramic Foodware

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Susan C. Hight

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314340.ch34

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 95th Annual Meeting and the 1993 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 95th Annual Meeting and the 1993 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 1

How to Cite

Hight, S. C. (1994) Regulatory and Research Methods Used by the U.S. FDA for Determination of Lead in Ceramic Foodware, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 95th Annual Meeting and the 1993 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 1 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314340.ch34

Author Information

  1. Elemental Research Branch (HFS-338) U.S. Food and Drug Administration Washington, DC 20204

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375297

Online ISBN: 9780470314340

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Keywords:

  • food and drug administration;
  • analytical;
  • migration;
  • colorimetric;
  • exposure

Summary

Regulatory decisions by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on ceramic foodware are based on lead levels found using the method of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists/American Society for Testing and Materials (AOAC/ASTM). Additional analytical methods and instrumental techniques, however, are available for research on lead migration from ceramic foodware. These methods include the use of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-emission spectroscopy. Also used are screening tests that employ colorimetric agents and radioisotope-induced X-ray emission spectrometry. Results obtained by these methods and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed.