Chapter 37. ISO 9000: Insight into the Certification Process

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Vincent W. Howell

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314340.ch37

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 95th Annual Meeting and the 1993 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 95th Annual Meeting and the 1993 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 1

How to Cite

Howell, V. W. (1994) ISO 9000: Insight into the Certification Process, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 95th Annual Meeting and the 1993 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 1 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314340.ch37

Author Information

  1. Corning Incorporated Corning, NY 14831

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375297

Online ISBN: 9780470314340

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Keywords:

  • benchmark;
  • compliance;
  • implementation;
  • specification;
  • perspective

Summary

With the unification of the European Economic Community at the end of 1992, European companies are quickly adopting the International Standards Organization (ISO) 9000 quality management system standard Some 90 countries have chosen ISO 9000 as their minimum benchmark for quality. Although it is not a requirement, many companies are now demanding that suppliers prove they have a system to ensure quality products and services before contracts will be awarded This “proving” is now, and it will increase in emphasis in the coming years, meaning that companies will have to be certified to this standard. A recent Electronic Business poll stated that by 1995, 66% of the companies polled planned to demand compliance, just to be considered for business opportunities. Other international companies have said they will demand certification by the end of 1993. Even now, thousands of European companies have attained certification. With a growing and demanding international marketplace, those companies planning to expand their business into Europe will be faced with playing by the rules that are now being developed. While some 500 U.S. companies have been recognized as ISO-certified, many more are beginning the process of learning and applying. This paper is presented to assist those considering implementation/certification by providing an understanding of the background, current issues, future direction of the standards, and insight into what it takes to attain certification by providing information from real-world experiences from companies that have been certified.