Chapter 19. A Partial Conversion of a Gas-Air-Fired Television Furnace to Oxy-Fuel Combustion

  1. John B Wachtman Jr.
  1. Arlene McMahon1 and
  2. Maynard Ding2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314401.ch19

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 54th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 54th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 2

How to Cite

McMahon, A. and Ding, M. (1994) A Partial Conversion of a Gas-Air-Fired Television Furnace to Oxy-Fuel Combustion, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 54th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314401.ch19

Author Information

  1. 1

    Corning Incorporated Corning, NY 14831

  2. 2

    Praxair Inc. Tarrytown, NY 10591

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375303

Online ISBN: 9780470314401

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • oxy-fuel;
  • plugging;
  • collapsing;
  • associated disadvantages;
  • praxair burners

Summary

Oxy-fuel became an attractive alternative to extend the furnace life of a television furnace that was experiencing severe plugging and collapsing of the checkers. The on-the-fly conversion was made by inserting oxy-fuel burners directly into the breast walls and replacing the energy in the affected ports with oxy-fuel combustion. The burners used for the conversion were Praxair L-burners. An additional advantage to the conversion was a substantial reduction in NOx. The NOx reduction was accomplished with only a portion of the furnace being fired on oxy-fuel burners. This paper will describe the conversion and review the results of the conversion.