Chapter 4. Sulfate Utilization in Float Glass Production

  1. John B Wachtman Jr.
  1. W. B. Gibbs1 and
  2. Warren Turner2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314401.ch4

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 54th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 54th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 2

How to Cite

Gibbs, W. B. and Turner, W. (1994) Sulfate Utilization in Float Glass Production, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 54th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314401.ch4

Author Information

  1. 1

    PPG Industries Wichita Falls, TX 76307

  2. 2

    Turner Process Research, Inc. Spring Church, PA 15686

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375303

Online ISBN: 9780470314401

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Keywords:

  • float glass;
  • fimace experiments;
  • chemical principles;
  • laboratory tests;
  • fitmace sulfate control

Summary

The use of batch sulfate as a melting and fining agent is common to both the float glass and container industries. But, to satisfy- quality requirements, the float glass process must produce glass that is orders-of-magnitude better than needed for a container operation. This level of melter seed cannot even be approached in laboratory tests. Production furnace experiments, guided by basic thermo-chemical principles, are the only reasonable way to relate mechanisms to results. The basic principles governing the melting and fining behavior in float glass production are summarized, and crucial differences between container furnace and float practice are noted. Furnace data are invoked to support the chemical inferences. Some of the more interesting findings relative to float technology are that the role of sulfate as a silica scavenger must be reinterpreted, and that batch redox is not the critical factor in float furnace sulfate control.