Chapter 7. Recycling of Electrostatic Precipitator Dust from Glass Furnaces

  1. John B Wachtman Jr.
  1. David T. Boothe1,
  2. Harold Severin1 and
  3. Clint Braine2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314401.ch7

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 54th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 54th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 2

How to Cite

Boothe, D. T., Severin, H. and Braine, C. (1994) Recycling of Electrostatic Precipitator Dust from Glass Furnaces, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 54th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314401.ch7

Author Information

  1. 1

    D. Boothe & Co., Inc. Sylvania, OH 43560

  2. 2

    GE Lighting Products Cleveland, OH 44112

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375303

Online ISBN: 9780470314401

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Keywords:

  • electrostatic precipitators;
  • wide acceptance;
  • abatingparticulate discharge;
  • material handling characteristics;
  • glassmaking process

Summary

Electrostatic precipitators have found wide acceptance in the glass industry for abating particulate discharge from glass furnaces. In the past, the relatively small amounts involved and the difficulties in handling the very fine, low-bulk-density material have made disposal in a landfill the least expensive method. Various efforts to improve the material handling characteristics, such as pelletization and roll compression, have had only mixed success. The required equipment is expensive and has high operating costs. Increasing disposal costs, legislative penalties, and spiraling raw material costs require reconsideration of the use of electrostatic precipitator (EP) dust as a batch material. In this paper, the choice of equipment, modifications to complement the existing facility, material characteristics of the collected dust, and the process requirements for two systems are described. Both systems successfully return EP dust to the batch house for incorporation into the glassmaking process with the use of dense-phase pneumatic conveying at Niles, OH, and dilute-phase, negative-pressure pneumatic conveying at Lexington, KY. Operational experiences since the installation are discussed. The systems are recommended as possible solutions for meeting the environmental concerns of a glass plant.