Chapter 18. Pure Silicon Carbide Fibers from Polymethylsilane

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Zhi-Fan Zhang,
  2. Cathy S. Scotto and
  3. Richard M. Laine

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314500.ch18

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 4

How to Cite

Zhang, Z.-F., Scotto, C. S. and Laine, R. M. (2008) Pure Silicon Carbide Fibers from Polymethylsilane, in Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314500.ch18

Author Information

  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375327

Online ISBN: 9780470314500

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Keywords:

  • precursor;
  • polycarbosilane;
  • dehydrocoupling;
  • polymerization;
  • exothermic

Summary

Polymethylsilane, -[MeSiH]x-, is synthesized as a precursor for processing SiC fibers. The stability of the polymer solution, the infusibility of precursor fibers, and the elemental stoichiometry were found to be controlled by addition of a spinning aid. Spun precursor fibers are readily converted to SiC ceramic fibers by pyrolysis in Ar at rates up to 20°C/min. Characterization by TGA, DTA, chemical analysis, XRD and SEM shows that these fibers are phase-pure, highly crystalline and dense. Fiber densities can reach > 3.1 g/cm3 when heated to high temperatures (> 1600°C). Fiber bending tests demonstrated that the process has excellent potential to produce fibers with superior mechanical properties. The entire process requires only three simple steps ∼ one-step synthesis, spinning, and one-step pyrolysis.