Chapter 28. Mechanical Properties of Nextel™ 312 Fiber-Reinforced SiC Matrix Composites in Tension

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. K. Ranji Vaidyanathan1,
  2. Jagannathan Sankar1,
  3. Ajit D. Kelkar1 and
  4. Bill L. Weaver2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314500.ch28

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 4

How to Cite

Vaidyanathan, K. R., Sankar, J., Kelkar, A. D. and Weaver, B. L. (1994) Mechanical Properties of Nextel™ 312 Fiber-Reinforced SiC Matrix Composites in Tension, in Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314500.ch28

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Mechanical Engineering, North Carolina A&T State University Greensboro, NC 27411

  2. 2

    Ceramic Technology Center, 3M Company, St. Paul, MN 55144

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375327

Online ISBN: 9780470314500

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Keywords:

  • vapor-phase;
  • carbide matrix;
  • infiltration;
  • inexpensive;
  • extensometer

Summary

Vapor-phase synthesis is emerging as a method for the preparation of near final-shape, ceramic matrix composites for advanced structural applications. Oxide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites are being developed for these applications. The mechanical properties of Nextel™ 312* and Nicalon™** fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites fabricated employing the forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) process were compared at room temperature in pure tension. A carbon interface layer was used for both types of composites. Because of the available FCVI apparatus, only short-length specimens (7 to 8 cms) could be fabricated. Room temperature tensile strengths were measured and compared to room temperature flexure strength results for the two types of composites. The possible factors responsible for the differences in tensile strength for the two types of composites are discussed.