Chapter 3. Comparison of the Dynamic Fatigue Behavior of Two Monolithic Sic and an Al2O3/SiC Composite.

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Kristin Breder and
  2. Victor J. Tennery

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314500.ch3

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 4

How to Cite

Breder, K. and Tennery, V. J. (1994) Comparison of the Dynamic Fatigue Behavior of Two Monolithic Sic and an Al2O3/SiC Composite., in Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314500.ch3

Author Information

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Temperature Materials Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6062

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375327

Online ISBN: 9780470314500

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Keywords:

  • carbide particulate;
  • environmental impact;
  • dimox;
  • exposure

Summary

Two monolithic silicon carbides, NT230 siliconized SiC from Norton Saint Gobain and sintered β-SiC from Coors, and a silicon carbide particulate reinforced alumina ceramic composite from Lanxide, which all are candidate materials for pressurized head exchangers in coal-fired power plants have been evaluated. The fast fracture flexure strength was measured as a function of temperature. All candidate materials retained a sufficient strength level up to 1400°C. The susceptibility to slow crack growth (SCG) was evaluated by the dynamic fatigue method at 1100°C and 1400°C. None of the materials exhibited SCG at 1100°C. At 1400°C the siliconized SiC ceramic showed limited SCG and the composite ceramic exhibited creep damage when stressed to 50% of fast fracture strength at the intermediate and slow stressing rates. This prevented the evaluation of the SCG properties of this material at 1400°C. Fractography supported the mechanical observations and with the exception of the specimens which exhibited creep damage, only the siliconized SiC showed a small SCG damage zone at long times at 1400°C