Chapter 32. Thermal Shock Behavior of Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCCs)

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Hongyu Wang1,
  2. Raj N. Singh2 and
  3. Richard A. Lowden2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314500.ch32

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 4

How to Cite

Wang, H., Singh, R. N. and Lowden, R. A. (2008) Thermal Shock Behavior of Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCCs), in Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314500.ch32

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0012

  2. 2

    Metals and Ceramics Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6063

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375327

Online ISBN: 9780470314500

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Keywords:

  • water quench;
  • monolithic;
  • turbine;
  • catastrophic;
  • conductivity

Summary

The thermal shock behavior of monolithic ceramics (Al2O3 and SiC) and continuous fiber ceramic composites (Nextel™ and Nicalon™ fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites) has been studied using the water quench technique. The study on the monolithic ceramics demonstrated the effects of material properties, microstructure, and processing on the thermal shock resistance of materials and provided reference data for the studies of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites. The continuous fiber ceramic composites had the capability of preventing catastrophic failure caused by thermal shock and were able to retain a significant portion of their original strength at ΔT = 1000°C. Possible mechanisms for the thermal shock damage of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites are discussed. Two criteria for evaluating the performance of CFCCs under thermal transient conditions and factors that affect these criteria are suggested.