Chapter 52. High Temperature Behavior of Salt Coated Nicalon Fiber Reinforced Calcium Aluminosilicate Composite

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. S.-W. Wang,
  2. R. W. Kowalik and
  3. R. Sands

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314500.ch52

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 4

How to Cite

Wang, S.-W., Kowalik, R. W. and Sands, R. (2008) High Temperature Behavior of Salt Coated Nicalon Fiber Reinforced Calcium Aluminosilicate Composite, in Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314500.ch52

Author Information

  1. Naval Air Warfare Center, Aircraft Division, Warminster, PA 18974

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375327

Online ISBN: 9780470314500

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Keywords:

  • embrittlement;
  • glass-ceramic;
  • hot-gas-path;
  • matrix cracking;
  • clip-on extensometer

Summary

The effects of molten salt (sodium sulfate) on the high temperature mechanical behavior of Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced calcium aluminosilicate are investigated in this study. Tensile specimens were coated with sodium sulfate and exposed at 900°C for 100 hours and then tested at 900°C. It has been shown that the strength of the composite was reduced due to salt induced oxidation embrittlement. The synergistic effect of matrix cracking and hot corrosion was also investigated. Strength was dramatically decreased in specimens which were preloaded and then exposed at elevated temperature. However, specimens which were preloaded prior to the hot corrosion exposure retained more of their strength than the specimens which experienced the same preload and heat-treatment with no salt. Possible degradation mechanisms of these specimens are discussed.