Chapter 65. Coal Slag Corrosion and Strength Degradation of Silicon Carbide/Alumina Composites

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Tina M. Strobel1,
  2. John P. Hurley1,
  3. Kristin Breder2 and
  4. John E. Holowczak3

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314500.ch65

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 4

How to Cite

Strobel, T. M., Hurley, J. P., Breder, K. and Holowczak, J. E. (1994) Coal Slag Corrosion and Strength Degradation of Silicon Carbide/Alumina Composites, in Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314500.ch65

Author Information

  1. 1

    Energy & Environmental Research Center University of North Dakota P.O. Box 9018 Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018

  2. 2

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6062

  3. 3

    United Technologies Research Center 411 Silver Lane East Hartford, CT 06108

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375327

Online ISBN: 9780470314500

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Keywords:

  • subbituminous;
  • combustion;
  • conductivities;
  • slagging;
  • fractographic

Summary

A silicon carbide particulate reinforced Al2O3 matrix composite, produced by the directed metal oxidation process (DIMOX™), was investigated for chemical and mechanical behavior in a coal combustion environment. Coupons of the material were subjected to static coal slag at 1093° and 1260°C for 300 hours. Two slags were used: one from a high-calcium subbituminous coal, the other from a high-iron bituminous coal. After exposure, the coupons were machined into flexure bars, and the remaining strength was measured. Pieces of the broken bars were then analyzed by scanning electron microscopy to determine the corrosion mechanisms and rates. The results are discussed in relation to the proposed application.