Chapter 22. Experimental Observation of the Failure Mechanisms of Metal/Ceramic Interfaces Under Mode I Loading

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Wayne E. King,
  2. G. H. Campbell,
  3. S. L. Stoner and
  4. W. L. Wien

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314555.ch22

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 5

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 5

How to Cite

King, W. E., Campbell, G. H., Stoner, S. L. and Wien, W. L. (1994) Experimental Observation of the Failure Mechanisms of Metal/Ceramic Interfaces Under Mode I Loading, in Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 5 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314555.ch22

Author Information

  1. Chemistry and Materials Science Department University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA 94550

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375334

Online ISBN: 9780470314555

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Keywords:

  • interfaces engineered;
  • materials systems;
  • interfacial bond;
  • theoretical modeling;
  • ultrahighvacuum diffusion bonding machine

Summary

Interfaces engineered into materials systems can serve to enhance properties and performance. “Failure” in these systems is often dictated by the strength of the interfacial bond between matrix and reinforcement. Inconsistent and inconclusive performance tests often limit both applications and effective theoretical modeling of properties. To enhance our ability to make contact with theoretical models, we have chosen to simplify the complex three-dimensional problem of composite materials by investigating two-dimensional bimaterial interface systems containing a single interface. To gain control over synthesis and processing parameters, we have designed, constructed, and are operating a unique capability for the production of highly controlled interfaces: an ultrahigh vacuum diffusion bonding machine. Results are presented from our initial work on Al-alloy/Al2O3 interfaces.