Chapter 33. Results of a Round Robin Exercise on the Fractography of Advanced Structural Ceramics

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Jeffrey J. Swab1 and
  2. George D. Quinn2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314555.ch33

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 5

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 5

How to Cite

Swab, J. J. and Quinn, G. D. (1994) Results of a Round Robin Exercise on the Fractography of Advanced Structural Ceramics, in Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 5 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314555.ch33

Author Information

  1. 1

    U.S. Army Research Laboratory — Materials Directorate Watertown, MA 02172

  2. 2

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, MD 20899

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375334

Online ISBN: 9780470314555

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Keywords:

  • fractography of advanced ceramics;
  • round robin exercise;
  • machining damage;
  • versailles project on advanced materials and standardization;
  • fractographic analysis of ceramic specimens

Summary

Eighteen agencies/institutes/laboratories participated in a VAMAS sponsored round robin exercise on fractography of advanced ceramics. Each participant was provided three sets of photographs and asked to characterize the machining damage in each set. The results showed that characterizing machining damage (or any origin) from photographs alone is not ideal. Actually viewing the specimen is more constructive. Most participants were unfamiliar with the subsurface nature of machining damage, and were focused on irregularities on the machined surfaces. Fracture mechanics is applicable to machining damage but most participants failed to use this tool to help them characterize the damage. Fracture mirrors, although easy to observe at low magnifications are difficult to delineate and measure in polycrystalline ceramics at higher magnifications.