Chapter 35. Four Point and Biaxial Flexure Strength of PZT Ceramics: A Probabilistic Approach

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. M. E. Manley1,
  2. T. Ertürk1,
  3. C. Vaucamps1 and
  4. D. Gailus2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314555.ch35

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 5

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 5

How to Cite

Manley, M. E., Ertürk, T., Vaucamps, C. and Gailus, D. (2008) Four Point and Biaxial Flexure Strength of PZT Ceramics: A Probabilistic Approach, in Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 5 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314555.ch35

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Massachusetts Lowell

  2. 2

    Graduate Student Visiting from E.N.S.C.P.B., France

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375334

Online ISBN: 9780470314555

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • piezoelectric ceramics disks;
  • teflon rings;
  • weilbull theory;
  • four point bend test;
  • multiaxial strength model

Summary

The strength of PZT piezoelectric ceramic disks were measured at room temperature both in four point bending using ASTM Standard C1161–320 and in biaxial flexure using a ring on ring test apparatus. The latter had Teflon rings supported by thin rubber diaphragms with water sealed under them. It was found that a specimen thickness to deflection ratio greater then 10 was necessary to prevent failures along the periphery of the inner ring. The multiaxial elemental strength model and Weibull theory were used to predict the biaxial flexure test results from the results of standard four point bend test. The multiaxial strength model made more conservative and more accurate predictions of the biaxial strength.