Chapter 46. The Effect of Fiber Coating Thickness on the Interfacial Properties of a Continuous Fiber Ceramic Matrix Composite

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio,
  2. Mattison K. Ferber and
  3. Richard A. Lowden

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314555.ch46

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 5

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 5

How to Cite

Lara-Curzio, E., Ferber, M. K. and Lowden, R. A. (1994) The Effect of Fiber Coating Thickness on the Interfacial Properties of a Continuous Fiber Ceramic Matrix Composite, in Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 5 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314555.ch46

Author Information

  1. Metals and Ceramics Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831–32064

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375334

Online ISBN: 9780470314555

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Keywords:

  • fiber coating thickness;
  • interfacial properties;
  • single-fiber push-out tests;
  • matrix infiltration;
  • interfacial shear strength

Summary

The interfacial properties (coefficient of friction, residual clamping stress, residual axial stress, and debond stress) of a continuous fiber ceramic composite were determined by means of single-fiber push-out tests. The composite consisted of Nicalon™ fibers, that had been coated prior to matrix infiltration with carbon layers ranging in thickness from 0.03 to 1.2 μm, and a CVI SiC matrix. It was found that the effective interfacial frictional stress decreased as the thickness of the carbon layer increased, from 24.6 ± 9.9 MPa for a thickness of 0.03 μm to 3.8 ± 1.4 MPa for a thickness of 1.25 μm. It was also found that both the coefficient of friction and the residual clamping stress decreased as the thickness of the carbon layer increased. These results are explained in terms of the state of residual stresses in this composite and the role of the fiber surface topography during fiber sliding.