Chapter 49. Micro-Laminate Ceramic/Ceramic Composites (YSZ/Al2O3) by Electrophoretic Deposition

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. P. Sarkar,
  2. O. Prakash,
  3. G. Wang and
  4. P. S. Nicholson

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314555.ch49

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 5

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 5

How to Cite

Sarkar, P., Prakash, O., Wang, G. and Nicholson, P. S. (1994) Micro-Laminate Ceramic/Ceramic Composites (YSZ/Al2O3) by Electrophoretic Deposition, in Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 5 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314555.ch49

Author Information

  1. Ceramic Research Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375334

Online ISBN: 9780470314555

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Keywords:

  • yttria-stabilised zirconia laminar microcomposites;
  • electrophoretic deposition;
  • microstructural features;
  • synthesis of laminar microcomposites;
  • electrical potential gradient

Summary

Yttria-stabilised zirconia (YSZ)/AI2O3 laminar microcomposites were fabricated by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). To enhance the mechanical properties of such layered composites, the individual layers were deposited with controlled thickness and microstructure. The microstructural features which were introduced are dispersed YSZ particles in AI2O3 layers and alumina platelets in YSZ layers. The fracture behaviour and mechanical response of these materials was evaluated using indentation and four-point bend tests at 25°C and 1300°C.