Chapter 50. Synthesis of Ti3SiC2-Based Materials Using Microwave-Initiated SHS

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. P. Komarenko and
  2. D. E. Clark

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314555.ch50

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 5

Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 5

How to Cite

Komarenko, P. and Clark, D. E. (1994) Synthesis of Ti3SiC2-Based Materials Using Microwave-Initiated SHS, in Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 5 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314555.ch50

Author Information

  1. Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32611

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375334

Online ISBN: 9780470314555

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Keywords:

  • microwave energy;
  • ion-exchange in glasses;
  • self-propagating high- temperature synthesi;
  • elemental powders;
  • model system

Summary

Preparation and characterization of ceramic materials in the Ti-Si-C system are presented. Mixtures of titanium, silicon and carbon powders were ignited by microwave energy. Powders prepared by conventional SHS and microwave-initiated SHS were compared. Compositional characteristics of these powders were determined using X-ray diffraction. Conventionally-ignited SHS compacts, with no sustainable heating after ignition, resulted in a product with a large fraction of TiC. Conventionally-ignited SHS samples that were sustainably heated for up to 30 minutes at 1400° −1450° C resulted in a product composed of TiC with traces of Ti3SiC2. Samples ignited and sustainably heated with microwave energy for up to 30 minutes at 1400°-1450° C resulted in a product that maintained a high fraction of the Ti3SiC2 phase. Microwave energy seemed to inhibit the decomposition and actually favor the formation of the Ti3SiC2 phase starting from Ti-Si-C powder mixtures.