Chapter 18. Attrition Mill Grinding of Refractories

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. John E. Becker

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314616.ch18

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 96th Annual Meeting and the 1994 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Refractory Ceramics/Basic Science: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 96th Annual Meeting and the 1994 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Refractory Ceramics/Basic Science: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 1

How to Cite

Becker, J. E. (1995) Attrition Mill Grinding of Refractories, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 96th Annual Meeting and the 1994 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Refractory Ceramics/Basic Science: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 1 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314616.ch18

Author Information

  1. Union Process, Inc., Akron, OH

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1995

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375341

Online ISBN: 9780470314616

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Keywords:

  • effectiveness;
  • speed;
  • temperature control;
  • ceramic;
  • glaze

Summary

The principles and applications of wet and dry grinding refractory materials in the attritor, a high-energy stirred ball mill, are presented. Batch, circulation, continuous, and highspeed attritors are described along with the advantages of attrition milling and specific applications. Attrition mill fine grinding of refractories vs. conventional fine grinding methods are compared to relative cost/energy effectiveness, speed, temperature control, and particle size distribution characteristics. Available ceramic media, appropriate contamination-free linings, and accessory equipment for specific refractory applications are presented.