Chapter 28. Recycling spent Refractory Materials at the U.S. Bureau of Mines

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. M. Abbot Maginnis and
  2. James P. Bennett

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314616.ch28

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 96th Annual Meeting and the 1994 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Refractory Ceramics/Basic Science: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 96th Annual Meeting and the 1994 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Refractory Ceramics/Basic Science: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 1

How to Cite

Maginnis, M. A. and Bennett, J. P. (1995) Recycling spent Refractory Materials at the U.S. Bureau of Mines, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 96th Annual Meeting and the 1994 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Refractory Ceramics/Basic Science: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 1 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314616.ch28

Author Information

  1. U.S. Bureau of Mines, Tuscaloosa Research Center, Tuscaloosa, AL

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1995

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375341

Online ISBN: 9780470314616

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Keywords:

  • refractory;
  • cost-effective;
  • technical;
  • economic;
  • regulatory

Summary

Researchers at the U.S. Bureau of Mines Tuscaloosa Research Center were among the first to conduct research aimed at evaluating the potential for recycling spent refractory materials. Changing conditions within industry have prompted a reexamination of past work and an examination of current recycling practice to help identify possible directions for future recycling research. The need to address that the technical and organizational issues associated with disposal/recycling spent refractory materials are increasing and require input from all segments of the industry to develop the least disruptive and most cost-effective solutions. Current technical, economic, and regulatory conditions suggest the most effective recycling program will require ongoing cooperative efforts on the part of industry, acade-mia, and government to establish a comprehensive, cost-effective recycling program. Past Bureau of Mines recycling research and an outline of a proposed refractory recycling program based on current economic and regulatory considerations will be presented.