Chapter 33. Agility, The Future for Ceramic Manufacturing

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Charles L. Booth and
  2. Marten P. Harmer

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314616.ch33

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 96th Annual Meeting and the 1994 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Refractory Ceramics/Basic Science: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 96th Annual Meeting and the 1994 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Refractory Ceramics/Basic Science: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 1

How to Cite

Booth, C. L. and Harmer, M. P. (2008) Agility, The Future for Ceramic Manufacturing, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 96th Annual Meeting and the 1994 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Refractory Ceramics/Basic Science: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 1 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314616.ch33

Author Information

  1. Ben Franklin Technology Center, Northeast Tier and Materials Research Center, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1995

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375341

Online ISBN: 9780470314616

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Keywords:

  • ceramic;
  • manufacturing;
  • organization;
  • structure;
  • agility

Summary

Recently, Lehigh University facilitated seminars to define manufacturing needs for the 21st century. The attending executives from 77 firms, including General Motors, FMC, and Alcoa, concluded that the future will be characterized by rapid changes in technology advances, customer demands, and shifts in market dynamics, and coined the term “agile manufacturing.” Agile manufacturing refers to the ability to thrive in an environment of constant unpredictable change. In an agile environment, market opportunities are attacked by partnering to form virtual firms to dynamically obtain the required skills in relatively short time for each product opportunity. We will describe and compare agile and traditional concepts of organization and structure, management policy and ethics, employee environment, product focus, information, and paradigm shift. Examples of agile manufacturing applied to ceramic materials are presented.