Chapter 7. Quality Control Practices for Determination of Lead and Cadmium in Ceramicware Leach Solutions by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Susan C. Hight

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314616.ch7

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 96th Annual Meeting and the 1994 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Refractory Ceramics/Basic Science: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 96th Annual Meeting and the 1994 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Refractory Ceramics/Basic Science: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 1

How to Cite

Hight, S. C. (1995) Quality Control Practices for Determination of Lead and Cadmium in Ceramicware Leach Solutions by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 96th Annual Meeting and the 1994 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Refractory Ceramics/Basic Science: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 1 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314616.ch7

Author Information

  1. U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Washington, DC

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1995

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375341

Online ISBN: 9780470314616

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Keywords:

  • ICP-AES;
  • FAAS;
  • ceramicware;
  • interference;
  • disadvantages

Summary

Substitution of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) for flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) in analysis of 4% (volume/volume) acetic acid leach solutions is discussed. Because of its simultaneous multielement capability and large working range, ICP-AES provides faster analyses than FAAS. However, ICP-AES is less sensitive and more subject to interference than FAAS. Quality control practices to overcome these disadvantages are presented. These practices include determination of quantitation limits for each batch of leach solutions analyzed and matrix matching of acid concentrations in leach and standard solutions. Selection of instrument operating parameters and use of interference check solutions to guarantee the absence of spectral interferences due to aluminum, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, nickel, titanium, vanadium, and zinc are discussed.