Chapter 15. Sampling and Testing Protocol for Characterizing Glass Cullet obtained from Postconsumer Sources

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. Floyd Karp and
  2. Bob Kirby

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314661.ch15

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 55th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 55th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 2

How to Cite

Karp, F. and Kirby, B. (1995) Sampling and Testing Protocol for Characterizing Glass Cullet obtained from Postconsumer Sources, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 55th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314661.ch15

Author Information

  1. Recycling Technology Assistance Partnership (ReTAP), Clean Washington Center, Seattle, WA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1995

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375358

Online ISBN: 9780470314661

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • methodology;
  • contamination;
  • recyclables;
  • beneficiators;
  • resolution

Summary

The Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT) is initiating a computerized cash exchange for trading of recyclable materials. One of the developmental barriers to the open trading of recovered glass cullet as a commodity has been the lack of a standard methodology to characterize the material. This paper provides an outline of a proposed protocol for sampling large quantities of cullet and for testing this cullet to determine its physical and chemical characteristics. The methods for selecting statistically representative glass cutlet samples include field sampling from a stockpile, transportation unit, conveyer, or a flowing stream. Standard methods are qualified for reducing field samples to testing size. Standard field tests for moisture content, particle size distribution, cullet color mix, and contamination by organic, ferrous, nonferwus, and ceramic materials are provided. Reliable common laboratory methods for determining glass chemical composition and details of cullet contamination are referenced and indexed. This sampling and testing protocol is intended to supply a common language of quality for both sources and users of postconsumer container glass cutlet This protocol removes one barrier to development of open trading of postconsumer glass cutlet as a commodity on the Chicago Board of Trade's electronic trading forum.