Chapter 18. Measurement of Hazardous Air Pollutants: Impact of the Clean Air Act on the Manufacturing Community

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. L. E. Jones and
  2. M. B. Ingram

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314708.ch18

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 1994 Ceramic Manufacturers and Suppliers Worskhop: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 3

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 1994 Ceramic Manufacturers and Suppliers Worskhop: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 3

How to Cite

Jones, L. E. and Ingram, M. B. (1995) Measurement of Hazardous Air Pollutants: Impact of the Clean Air Act on the Manufacturing Community, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 1994 Ceramic Manufacturers and Suppliers Worskhop: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 3 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314708.ch18

Author Information

  1. New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred, NY

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1995

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375365

Online ISBN: 9780470314708

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Keywords:

  • emissions;
  • concentration;
  • parameters;
  • regulation;
  • identification

Summary

Understanding which species are volatile or are produced as a function of the conditions associated with the manufacturing of specific glass compositions is clearly valuable to the glass industry in an age in which society has become more aware of the environment. In fact, regulations in the form of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act have forced us to reevaluate the influence of glass manufacturing on the emissions of deleterious gases. There are several different types of emissions common to the glass industry. These include, but are not limited to, oxides of nitrogen (NOX), oxides of sulfur (SOX), oxides of carbon, volatile hydrocarbons, and particulates. The focus of an ongoing study at Alfred University is the release of emissions as a function of the glass batch composition. The objective of the work is to accurately and sensitively measure the concentration ofNOX, SOX, and volatile alkali emissions in the effluent gas stream as influenced by glass composition and a wide variety of processing parameters.