Chapter 1. Diamond as the Ultimate Ceramic

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. Liselotte J. Schioler Sc.D.

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314715.ch1

Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 4

How to Cite

Schioler, L. J. (1995) Diamond as the Ultimate Ceramic, in Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314715.ch1

Author Information

  1. SI Diamond Technology, Inc. Reston, VA 22091

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1995

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375372

Online ISBN: 9780470314715

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Keywords:

  • exhibits;
  • ceramics;
  • tungsten;
  • gemstones;
  • molten

Summary

Diamond exhibits many of the same properties as a typical ceramic: hardness, brittleness, low electrical conductivity, a wide band gap, etc. Understanding the limitations and benefits of diamond can be facilitated by relating it to ceramics. Why then is it not considered a ceramic? Perhaps it is because until recently, it was available only in relatively small quantities at a fairly high price.

The discovery that diamond can be synthesized by other than high-pressure, high-temperature, methods has opened up a whole new world of products that capitalize on its unique and not-so-unique properties. These products range from hard coatings for cuttings tools to high thermal conductivity substrates for chips to cold cathodes. Recent developments from a variety of companies will be reviewed.