Chapter 23. Redistribution Reactions in Blackglas™ During Pyrolysis and Their Effect on Oxidative Stability

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. Frances I. Hurwitz1,
  2. Paula J, Heimann2 and
  3. Terrence A. Kacik2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314715.ch23

Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 4

How to Cite

Hurwitz, F. I., Heimann, P. J. and Kacik, T. A. (1995) Redistribution Reactions in Blackglas™ During Pyrolysis and Their Effect on Oxidative Stability, in Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314715.ch23

Author Information

  1. 1

    NASA Lewis Research Center Cleveland, OH 44135

  2. 2

    Cleveland State University Cleveland, OH 44115

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1995

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375372

Online ISBN: 9780470314715

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Keywords:

  • blackglas™ thermogravimetric;
  • infrared;
  • pyrolysis;
  • silsesquioxane-derived

Summary

The structure of Blackglas™ 493 was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, x-ray diffraction and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies as a function of pyrolysis temperature and time. Si-H and C-H groups persisted even after pyrolysis at 1000°C for 5 hours. Si-O and Si-C bonds were observed to redistribute with increasing temperature. Over the 800–1000°C range, the 29Si NMR peaks appear to sharpen, possibly as the result of increased ordering within the oxycarbide network. Oxidative stability increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature and time, suggesting a need to pyrolyze at temperatures significantly higher than the projected use temperature.