Chapter 15. PIP Processing, Microstructure and Properties of Si3N4 Fiber and Al2O3 Fiber Reinforced Silicon Nitride

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Stuart T. Schwab,
  2. Richard A. Page,
  3. David L. Davidson and
  4. Renee C. Graef

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314784.ch15

Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 5

Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 5

How to Cite

Schwab, S. T., Page, R. A., Davidson, D. L. and Graef, R. C. (1995) PIP Processing, Microstructure and Properties of Si3N4 Fiber and Al2O3 Fiber Reinforced Silicon Nitride, in Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 5 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314784.ch15

Author Information

  1. Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas 78238-5166

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1995

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375389

Online ISBN: 9780470314784

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Keywords:

  • emphasizing;
  • statistical principles;
  • descriptions;
  • construction;
  • indispensable

Summary

Polymer infiltration/pyrolysis (PIP) processing has the potential to become an affordable means of manufacturing continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix components. The PIP method is very similar to the well known polymer-matrix and carbon-carbon composite manufacturing techniques, the major difference being the use of a preceramic polymer in place of the organic polymer or carbon precursor. To date, the majority of research in the field of preceramic polymers has centered on precursors to silicon carbide (SiC). The Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) has focused on the development of polymeric precursors to silicon nitride (Si3N4) because its high-temperature strength, resistance to oxidation, and other properties make it an attractive candidate for many advanced high-temperature structural applications. PIP Si3N4 composites with NICALON SiC fiber reinforcement have exhibited good fracture toughness (Klc ∼ 16 MPa • m1/2). We report here processing, microstructure, and preliminary mechanical properties of two new PIP Si3N4 composites. One is reinforced with Tonen Si3N4 fiber (plain weave), while the other is reinforced with Almax Al2O3 fiber (8 Harness satin weave).