Chapter 33. Differences in Creep Performance of a HIPed Silicon Nitride in Ambient air and Inert Environments

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. A. A. Wereszczak,
  2. T. P. Kirkland and
  3. M. K. Ferber

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314784.ch33

Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 5

Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 5

How to Cite

Wereszczak, A. A., Kirkland, T. P. and Ferber, M. K. (1995) Differences in Creep Performance of a HIPed Silicon Nitride in Ambient air and Inert Environments, in Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 5 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314784.ch33

Author Information

  1. High Temperature Materials Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6069

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1995

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375389

Online ISBN: 9780470314784

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Keywords:

  • melting furnaces;
  • recuperators;
  • vibratory;
  • air detour funnels;
  • installation

Summary

High temperature tensile creep studies of a commercially available hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) silicon nitride were conducted in ambient air and argon environments. The creep performance of this HIPed silicon nitride was found to be different in these environments. The material crept faster (and had a consequential shorter lifetime) in argon than in ambient air at 137O°C at tensile stresses between 110-140 MPa. The stress dependence of the minimum creep rate was found to be ≈ 6 in argon and ≈ 3.5 in air, while the minimum creep rates were almost an order of magnitude faster in argon than in air at equivalent tensile stresses. Differences in the creep performance are explained with reference to the presence or absence of oxygen in the two environments.