Chapter 34. Coal Slag Corrosion and Strength Degradation of Siliconized Silicon Carbide

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Tina M. Strobel1,
  2. John P. Hurley1,
  3. Kristin Breder2 and
  4. John E. Holowczak3

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314784.ch34

Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 5

Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 5

How to Cite

Strobel, T. M., Hurley, J. P., Breder, K. and Holowczak, J. E. (1995) Coal Slag Corrosion and Strength Degradation of Siliconized Silicon Carbide, in Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 5 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314784.ch34

Author Information

  1. 1

    Energy & Environmental Research Center University of North Dakota Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018

  2. 2

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6062

  3. 3

    United Technologies Research Center East Hartford, CT 06108

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1995

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375389

Online ISBN: 9780470314784

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Keywords:

  • algorithm;
  • tonnage conditions;
  • variation;
  • transient;
  • parameters

Summary

To achieve greater efficiency in coal-fired combustors, higher working fluid temperatures must be achieved; therefore, heat exchangers must withstand higher temperatures in a corrosive environment. A possible heat exchanger material, siliconized silicon carbide, was investigated for chemical and mechanical behavior after corrosion by static coal ash-slag at 1090°C and 1260°C for 300 hours. After exposure, all samples showed some loss in strength. The samples were then analyzed by scanning electron microscopy to determine corrosion mechanisms. The surfaces of the samples were pitted and contained iron silicides, graphite, and residual ash-slag.