Chapter 46. Ceramic Coatings for Protecting Titanium Alloys in High Temperature Hydrogen Environment

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. C. T. Lee,
  2. R. O. Loutfy and
  3. J. C. Withers

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314784.ch46

Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 5

Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 5

How to Cite

Lee, C. T., Loutfy, R. O. and Withers, J. C. (1995) Ceramic Coatings for Protecting Titanium Alloys in High Temperature Hydrogen Environment, in Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 5 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314784.ch46

Author Information

  1. Materials and Electrochemical Research Corporation 7960 South Kolb Road Tucson, AZ 85706

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1995

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375389

Online ISBN: 9780470314784

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • ingredient;
  • probable;
  • statistical;
  • calibration;
  • distribution

Summary

Titanium alloys have high specific strength but are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement at high temperatures. Their use in many aerospace applications using hydrogen as fuel would require that they be protected with coatings. This work investigated the effectiveness of several commercial ceramic coatings for protecting Ti alloys from hydrogen attack. The properties of coated and uncoated titanium alloy samples as a function of hydrogen treatment temperatures and pressures were measured. It was found that without a coating, titanium alloy samples picked up appreciable amounts of hydrogen and embrittled after 30 minutes treatment at 500 °C. TiN, ZrN and Ti(C,N) coatings with a thickness of about 2 microns effectively protected titanium alloy samples from hydrogen attack up to 800°C for 30 minutes at a hydrogen pressure of 7 MPa (1014 psi).