Chapter 49. Feasibility of Ceramic Joining with High Energy Electron Beams

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. B. N. Turman,
  2. S. J. Glass,
  3. J. A. Halbleib,
  4. D. R. Helmich and
  5. R. E. Loehman

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314784.ch49

Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 5

Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 5

How to Cite

Turman, B. N., Glass, S. J., Halbleib, J. A., Helmich, D. R. and Loehman, R. E. (1995) Feasibility of Ceramic Joining with High Energy Electron Beams, in Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 16, Issue 5 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314784.ch49

Author Information

  1. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185; J. R. Clifford, Titan Corporation, Albuquerque, NM, 87106

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1995

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375389

Online ISBN: 9780470314784

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Keywords:

  • characteristics;
  • durability;
  • ultraviolet;
  • durability;
  • orifice

Summary

Joining structural ceramics is possible using high melting point metals such as Mo and Pt that are heated with a high energy electron beam, with the potential for producing joints with high temperature capability. A 10 MeV electron beam can penetrate through 1 cm of ceramic, offering the possibility of buried interface joining. Because of transient heating and the lower heat capacity of the metal relative to the ceramic, a pulsed high power beam has the potential for melting the metal without decomposing or melting the adjacent ceramic. We have demonstrated the feasibility of the process with a series of 10 MeV, 1 kW electron beam experiments. Shear strengths up to 28 MPa have been measured for Si3N4-Mo-Si3N4. These modest strengths are due to beam non-uniformity and the limited area of bonding. The bonding mechanism appears to be a thin silicide reaction layer. Si3N4-Si3N4 joints with no metal layer were also produced, apparently bonded by melting of an yttrium apatite grain boundary phase. This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.