Chapter 19. International Standards for Lead and Cadmium Release from Ceramic Foodware Surfaces

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. Richard L. Lehman

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314807.ch19

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 97th Annual Meeting and the 1995 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 97th Annual Meeting and the 1995 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 1

How to Cite

Lehman, R. L. (2008) International Standards for Lead and Cadmium Release from Ceramic Foodware Surfaces, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 97th Annual Meeting and the 1995 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 1 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314807.ch19

Author Information

  1. Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1996

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375402

Online ISBN: 9780470314807

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Keywords:

  • flatware;
  • toxicologists;
  • methodology;
  • cadmium;
  • geometry

Summary

Although instances of heavy metal poisoning from ceramic foodware surfaces are rare, international standards for test methods and permissible limits are necessary to ensure world health, particularly in undeveloped and developing countries and to facilitate trade among all countries. International regulations on ceramic foodware in contact with food have been issued by ISO Technical Committee 166 since 1981, and current modifications of the standards are aimed at harmonizing various national and regional regulations. The principal difference in existing test methods and reporting protocols relates to flatware, where concentration and mass per unit area reporting methods vary by country. The differences in heavy metal release for identical ceramic surfaces as measured by the concentration method are examined as the fill depth of flatware is altered. The mass per unit area reporting methodology appears to be superior since the concentration method can lead to measurement variability of up to 300%. ISO standards are being revised, and the new standards will eliminate many defects of the old standards.