Chapter 21. In Situ Liquid Pressure Measurements Using a Hypodermic Needle: Constant Rate Pressure Casting

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. Ching-Yao Lin and
  2. B. J. Kellett

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314807.ch21

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 97th Annual Meeting and the 1995 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 97th Annual Meeting and the 1995 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 1

How to Cite

Lin, C.-Y. and Kellett, B. J. (1996) In Situ Liquid Pressure Measurements Using a Hypodermic Needle: Constant Rate Pressure Casting, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 97th Annual Meeting and the 1995 Fall Meetings of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 1 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314807.ch21

Author Information

  1. University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1996

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375402

Online ISBN: 9780470314807

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Keywords:

  • phenomenon;
  • displacement;
  • electroconductive;
  • ultrasonic;
  • particle

Summary

A method for measuring the liquid pressure within a pressure casting unit is described. Measurements of the in situ liquid pressure within a pressure casting unit are shown for both a highly flocculated and dispersed slurry. The liquid pressure measured in situ to the pressure casting cell exhibits rapid pressure increases up to the piston stress. Liquid pressure variations exist during pressure casting and lead to non uniform cake density. Measured liquid pressure variations suggest ideal cake models that assume uniform particle packing are not accurate. Results suggest that more complex behavior associated with the nonuniform consolidation of the cake occurs, perhaps by a friction-driven slip-stick mechanism.