Chapter 10. Submersed Combustion Furnace for Glass Melts

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. Vladimir M. Olabin,
  2. Leonard S. Pioro,
  3. Alexander B. Maximuk,
  4. Mark J. Khinkis and
  5. Hamid A. Abbasi

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314814.ch10

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2

How to Cite

Olabin, V. M., Pioro, L. S., Maximuk, A. B., Khinkis, M. J. and Abbasi, H. A. (1996) Submersed Combustion Furnace for Glass Melts, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314814.ch10

Author Information

  1. The Gas Institute, Kiev, Ukraine

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1996

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375419

Online ISBN: 9780470314814

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Keywords:

  • institute of gas technology;
  • electric furnaces;
  • fuel-oxidant mixture;
  • mineral wool;
  • combustion air temperature

Summary

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) recently has licensed a submerged combustion melting technology from its developer; the Gas Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (GI), for exclusive application outside the former Soviet Union. Submerged combustion melting involves firing fuel and an oxidant directly into the bath of material being melted. The combustion gases bubble through the bath, providing high-heat transfer to the bath and turbulence to promote mixing and uniform product composition. Melted material is drained from a tap near the bottom of the bath. Raw material, which requires little or no crushing, is fed to the top of the bath. Two 75 ton/d submerged combustion melters are currently in operation for mineral wool production: one in Ukraine and the other in Belarus. These commercial melters use recuperators to preheat combustion air to 300°C. Both melters operate with less than 10% excess air and produce NOx emissions of less than 100 vppm (corrected to 0% O2) along with very low CO emissions. Work is underway at GI to improve both the thermal efflciency and the specific production rate by increasing the combustion air temperature to 400°C and incorporating a heat recovery batch (charge) pre-heater to provide 750--900°C batch preheat. An advanced pilot-scale facility is being planned for construction at the GI and a 6 ton/d unit is being built at IGT for further development of technology for the production of mineral wool and other products (sodium silicate glass, foam glass, cement, etc.).