Chapter 13. Ongoing Investigation of Oxy-Fuel Firing Impact on Corrosion of Nonglass Contact Refractories, Part 2

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. A. Gupta1 and
  2. S. M. Winder2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314814.ch13

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2

How to Cite

Gupta, A. and Winder, S. M. (1996) Ongoing Investigation of Oxy-Fuel Firing Impact on Corrosion of Nonglass Contact Refractories, Part 2, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314814.ch13

Author Information

  1. 1

    Carborundum Monofrax Refractories Division, Falconer, New York

  2. 2

    Carborundum Technology Center, Niagara Falls, New York

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1996

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375419

Online ISBN: 9780470314814

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • oxy-fuel combustion;
  • glass-melting furnace;
  • corrosion mechanisms;
  • fused-cast alumina refractories;
  • glass industry

Summary

The use of oxy-fuel combustion in place of air-fuel has led the glass industry to search for more corrosion-resistant refractories for glass-melting furnace crown applications. A laboratory test facility was developed to compare performance of refractories in corrosive atmospheres generated by glass melts under air-fuel and oxy-fuel combustion. Generic glass compositions, considered representative of container, fiber, and TV glasses, were selected for study. A range of fused-cast and bonded refractories were subjected to vapor phase corrosion under oxy-fuel and air-fuel atmospheres in the test facility. Microanalysis was used to determine diffusion depths and corrosion mechanisms in selected refractories, and results were compared with data from thermodynamic modeling and phase diagrams. Thermodynamic calculations and laboratory corrosion testing indicate that pressed and fired silica and mullite refractories are susceptible to accelerated corrosion under oxy-fuel combustion environments. Fused-cast alumina refractories showed excellent resistance to vapor corrosion in soda-lime container glass. Fused-cast α-β-alumina is recommended as a candidate for crown refractory application. The acceleration of corrosion in a conventional crucible vapor corrosion test can lead to incorrect material selection.