Chapter 15. Design Modeling of Glass Furnace OXY-Fuel Conversion Using Three-Dimensional Combustion Models

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. K. T. Wu1 and
  2. M. K. Misra2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314814.ch15

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2

How to Cite

Wu, K. T. and Misra, M. K. (1996) Design Modeling of Glass Furnace OXY-Fuel Conversion Using Three-Dimensional Combustion Models, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314814.ch15

Author Information

  1. 1

    Praxair Inc., Tarrytown, New York

  2. 2

    Corning Inc., Coming, New York

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1996

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375419

Online ISBN: 9780470314814

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Keywords:

  • glass furnaces;
  • oxy-fuel firing;
  • alkali volatilization;
  • glass quality;
  • fluid dynamics

Summary

Converting glass furnaces to oxy-fuel firing has progressed in the glass industry because of many process merits. The wide spectrum of different furnace design needs and operating requirements has prompted rapid development in the applications of engineering computer models as a design tool. Typically, the models are used either to screen design concepts or to help process understanding through detailed or engineering predictions. This paper discusses modeling approaches and model components in general and demonstrates applications of three-dimensional combustion models to oxy-firel conversion projects through case examples. Specific emphasis is placed on practical design parameters such as burner elevation and furnace crown height. Experiences with predicting superstructure temperatures and their variation with fuel distribution are reviewed. This paper also presents a model developed to predict alkali volatilization from glass surfaces. The impact of burner elevation on furnace alkali-volatile distribution and particulate emissions is discussed.