Chapter 16. Heat Transfer Optimization in TV Glass Furnaces

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. William J. Horan1,
  2. Aleksandar G. Slavejkov2 and
  3. Leon L. Chang2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314814.ch16

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2

How to Cite

Horan, W. J., Slavejkov, A. G. and Chang, L. L. (1996) Heat Transfer Optimization in TV Glass Furnaces, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314814.ch16

Author Information

  1. 1

    Techneglas, Inc., Pittston, Pennsylvania

  2. 2

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, Pennsylvania

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1996

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375419

Online ISBN: 9780470314814

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Keywords:

  • oxy-fuel firing;
  • glass furnaces;
  • combustion system;
  • columbus melter;
  • oxy-fuel burners

Summary

Techneglas gained invaluable experience with oxy-fuel firing when it converted two funnel glass furnaces in Columbus, Ohio. Continuing this trend of conversions from air to oxygen firing, Techneglas converted a TV panel furnace in Pittston, Pennsylvania, in July 1995. An important factor in achieving high-quality glass is the combustion system. Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has developed a new oxy-fuel technology that offers enhanced performance compared to other oxy-fuel burners. The new burner produces flames that have higher radiation and better bath coverage than previously commercialized low-momentum oxy-fuel burners that are being used to melt glass. Initial burner testing in Techneglas's oxy-fuel furnace in Columbus demonstrated benefits of the higher flame radiation. With just one new burner installed and a constant fuel input, furnace temperatures increased both on the crown and glass bottom. In addition, the batch and scum lines moved back during the test. The observed changes in furnace operation indicated the potential to reduce both fuel and oxygen usage by 5--10% over expected normal fuel savings when converting from air to oxygen firing. The full conversion in Pittston has confirmed the enhanced heat transfer performance of the new burner system. During the initial furnace fill, Techneglas was able to achieve a much higher furnace charging rate than the two earlier oxy-fuel startups in Columbus. This is attributed to both the improved furnace design and the performance of the new burner system.