Chapter 19. Is Your Class Full of Water?

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. John T. Brown1 and
  2. Hisashi Kobayashi2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314814.ch19

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2

How to Cite

Brown, J. T. and Kobayashi, H. (1996) Is Your Class Full of Water?, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314814.ch19

Author Information

  1. 1

    Coming, Inc., Coming, New York

  2. 2

    Praxair, Inc., Tarrytown, New York

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1996

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375419

Online ISBN: 9780470314814

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Keywords:

  • glass manufacturing;
  • air-fuel fired furnaces;
  • hydroxyl concentration;
  • glass quality;
  • side-fired container furnace

Summary

All commercial glasses contain water. The water content varies as ambient conditions change the water content of combustion ail: Oxy-fuel melting raises water in glasses proportional to the square root of the increase in water vapor over the melt. This increase in water vapor over the melt approaches four times the air case for high-cullet gas/oxygen melting. Techniques are available to measure water in glass that are similar in cost to other glass oxides. The authors have participated in over 60 commercial furnace conversions to oxy-fuel. The benefits of higher β-OH in the glass are reviewed for many of these furnaces.