Chapter 3. Glass Furnace HO, Control with Gas Reburn

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. Richard Koppang1,
  2. David Moyeda1 and
  3. Lesley Donaldson2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314814.ch3

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2

How to Cite

Koppang, R., Moyeda, D. and Donaldson, L. (1996) Glass Furnace HO, Control with Gas Reburn, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314814.ch3

Author Information

  1. 1

    Energy and Environmental Research Corporation, Irvine, California

  2. 2

    Gas Research Institute, Chicago, Illinois

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1996

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375419

Online ISBN: 9780470314814

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Keywords:

  • glass furnace;
  • gas research institute;
  • glass industry;
  • solid waste incinerators;
  • cement kilns

Summary

Large glass furnaces are significant emitters of HO, because of the high-temperature environment in the melte,: Emissions of side port fired furnaces, which are found frequently in container and float glass manufacturing, are among the highest of any combustion equipment and can exceed 20 lb/ton (>2 lb/MMBtu fired), weighing more than all but cement kilns, which are comparable. Because of this and the ongoing regulatory environment, the glass industry is faced with regional limits as low as 0.8 lb/ton (California RECLAIM). More typically, regulatory requirements will dictate 40--80% control over current levels. The only known commercialized technology capable of deep control is a full conversion to oxy-fuel to eliminate air-sourced N2 Although this technology offers some benefits, like improved fuel efficiency and lower furnace rebuild costs, the cost of high-purity oxygen generally overwhelms annualized operating costs. What is required is a retro-fit technology, which achieves the deep control of oxy-fuel with a cost-effectiveness similar to less-performing combustion modifications. The objective of this Gas Research Institute (GRI) sponsored program was to establish the technical and economic feasibility of gas reburn technology as currently practiced in incinerators and large utility boilers to glass furnaces. The gas reburn technology is implemented by creating a fuel-rich zone in the furnace port. At typical port temperatures, the reburn fuel, natural gas, fragments into reactive species, which selectively reduce HO, to elemental N2 The uncombusted products are subsequently burned out by adding air over the regenerator packing. A multi-phase program has been implemented that has established economic and technical feasibility and performed sufficient development work to implement a field test program on a large, side port fired container furnace. This paper describes the design methodology and its use in developing the design of a full-scale field test project. Some proforma estimates of cost effectiveness have been developed from the design, and some limited field test data is evaluated against the performance criteria. The objectives of a 75% reduction in HO, appear feasible with no major furnace impacts.