Chapter 9. Segregation Affects Glass Quality

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. David Stuart-Dick

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314814.ch9

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2

How to Cite

Stuart-Dick, D. (1996) Segregation Affects Glass Quality, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 56th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314814.ch9

Author Information

  1. Jenike & Johanson, Inc., San Luis Obispo, California

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1996

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375419

Online ISBN: 9780470314814

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Keywords:

  • glass quality;
  • segregation mechanism;
  • air stream;
  • fluidization;
  • melting glass batch

Summary

Segregation of particle sizes in a free-flowing granular material like glass batch can have significant effects on glass quality. The fine and coarse fractions usually will have different bulk densities, chemical compositions, heat transfer coefficients, and angles of repose, and consequently will behave and react differently from each other and from a well-mixed batch. Segregation usually starts at the discharge point of the mine, Particle sizes continue to segregate through the conveying system and the surge bin or day bin. The result of the segregation is a time variation in the quality of the batch being delivered to the furnace. This paper discusses the mechanisms by which mixtures can segregate and solids handling equipment designs that will counteract the effects of segregation.