Chapter 21. Development High-Temperature Hydrogen Sensor Based on Pyrochlore Type of Proton-Conductive Solid Electrolyte

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Serge Zhuiykov

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314821.ch21

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 3

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 3

How to Cite

Zhuiykov, S. (1996) Development High-Temperature Hydrogen Sensor Based on Pyrochlore Type of Proton-Conductive Solid Electrolyte, in Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 3 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314821.ch21

Author Information

  1. Ceramic Oxide Fahricators Pty. Ltd., 83 Wood St., Eaglehawk, VIC 3556, Australia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1996

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375426

Online ISBN: 9780470314821

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Keywords:

  • conductivity;
  • electrolytes;
  • characteristics;
  • deposition;
  • diffraction

Summary

The L development and use of ammonium tantalum tungsten oxide as a proton conductive solid electrolyte for hydrogen sensor based on electromotive force (EMF) measurement were studied and are described in this paper. This material exhibited the highest level of conductivity and sensitivity to Hz among pyrochlores with hydrogen content at temperatures ranging from 400 to 723K. The sensitivity to H2, the working temperature range, as well as the measured hydrogen range strongly depended on the degree of substitution of Rb+ by NH4+ in the ceramic. In particular, the ammonium tantalum tungsten oxide has the widest operating temperature range from 400 to 723K when the degree of substitution equals 96% and more, and can reliably measure a H2 concentration from 8 to 900000 parts per million (ppm), respectively. The 90% of the sensor's response time at T = 400–723K is within 30–100 seconds.