Chapter 3. Analyses of Residual Thermal Stresses in Ceramic Matrix Composites

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. C. H. Hsueh and
  2. P. F. Becher

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314821.ch3

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 3

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 3

How to Cite

Hsueh, C. H. and Becher, P. F. (1996) Analyses of Residual Thermal Stresses in Ceramic Matrix Composites, in Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 3 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314821.ch3

Author Information

  1. Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831–6068

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1996

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375426

Online ISBN: 9780470314821

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • inclusions;
  • analyzed;
  • microstructures;
  • thermomechanical;
  • analytical solutions

Summary

Residual thermal stresses in ceramic matrix composites containing either ellipsoidal inclusions or short fibers (i.e., fibers of finite length) are considered. The residual stresses in ellipsoidal inclusions are uniform, and they are analyzed using a modified Eshelby model. Although closed-form analytical solutions can be obtained, their formulations are formidable. When the aspect ratio of the ellipsoid is 0,1, or infinity, simple analytical solutions can be obtained using different models, and they are in excellent agreement with those obtained from the modified Eshelby model. Residual stresses in short fibers are non-uniform, and they are analyzed using a modified shear lag model, in which imaginary fibers are introduced to satisfy the continuity condition at the fiber ends. The analytical solutions are compared to the experimental results.