Chapter 7. Hardness and Brittleness of Ceramics

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Janet B. Quinn1 and
  2. George D. Quinn2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314821.ch7

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 3

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 3

How to Cite

Quinn, J. B. and Quinn, G. D. (1996) Hardness and Brittleness of Ceramics, in Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 3 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314821.ch7

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Engineering Materials, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742

  2. 2

    Ceramics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1996

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375426

Online ISBN: 9780470314821

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Keywords:

  • characterize;
  • transition;
  • interpretation;
  • characterize;
  • densification

Summary

Hardness is commonly used to characterize ceramics at a single load or over a range of loads in order to study the indentation size effect (ISE). Extensive new experimental work on ceramics suggests that hardness versus load curves exhibit a transition point to constant hardness that may be related to the brittleness of ceramics. This transition is studied and a new interpretation of the hardness of ceramics is presented. A new parameter to characterize the brittleness of ceramics is proposed.