Chapter 21. Damage Evolution Due to Thermal Shock in a 2-D Woven Fiber-Reinforced CVI SiC Composite

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. James E. Webb and
  2. Raj N. Singh

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314876.ch21

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 4

How to Cite

Webb, J. E. and Singh, R. N. (1996) Damage Evolution Due to Thermal Shock in a 2-D Woven Fiber-Reinforced CVI SiC Composite, in Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314876.ch21

Author Information

  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH 45221-0012

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1996

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375433

Online ISBN: 9780470314876

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Keywords:

  • water quench technique;
  • thermal shock damage;
  • optical microscopy;
  • quench cycles;
  • fiber-matrix interfacial debonding

Summary

A water quench technique was used to study the effects of thermal shock on a 2-D woven Nicalon™ fiber-reinforced CVI SiC matrix composite. Thermal shock damage was characterized by optical microscopy as a function of quench temperature difference (AT) and number of quench cycles. The observed thermal shock damage consisted of small matrix cracks and fiber-matrix interfacial debonding on the surface and large interior cracks in the matrix that formed between and parallel to the fiber cloths. At low ΔT's only small matrix cracks on the surface were observed and were linked to initial decreases in Young's modulus. At higher ΔT's larger cracks between the fiber cloths in the specimen interior were observed and linked to decreases in the ultimate flexural strength.