Chapter 27. Interfacial Bonding of Carbon-Coated Glass Fiber Reinforced Cement

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Chao M. Huang1,
  2. D. Zhu1,
  3. C. X. Dong1,
  4. W. M. Kriven1,
  5. R. Loh Kriven2 and
  6. J. Huang2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314876.ch27

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 4

How to Cite

Huang, C. M., Zhu, D., Dong, C. X., Kriven, W. M., Kriven, R. L. and Huang, J. (1996) Interfacial Bonding of Carbon-Coated Glass Fiber Reinforced Cement, in Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314876.ch27

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801

  2. 2

    Owens-Corning Science & Technology Center, 2790 Columbus Rd., Route 16, Granville, Ohio 43023

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1996

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375433

Online ISBN: 9780470314876

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Keywords:

  • interfacial mechanical bonding;
  • frictional stress;
  • carbon-coated s-glass fiber;
  • fiber push-out techruque;
  • s-glass monofilaments

Summary

Interfacial mechanical bonding strength and frictional stress of carbon-coated S-glass fiber reinforced cement were characterized by a fiber push-out technique. The push-out experiments were conducted on model composites, where the S-glass monofilaments with/without carbon coating were unidirectionally embedded in the ordinary Portland cement (OPC). The composite with a carbon interface exhibits a weaker interfacial bonding strength (14 MPa) and lower frictional stress (10 MPa) than that (37 MPa and 28 MPa, respectively) of the composite without a carbon interface. SEM observations indicated that the filament without carbon coating was significantly attacked and strongly bonded onto the matrix, while the filament with carbon coating retained intact under the same curing conditions. The studies suggested that the carbon coating provides glass fiber with significantly improved corrosion resistance to alkali in the cement environment.