Chapter 44. Performance of Blackglas™ Composites in 4000-Hour Oxidation Study

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. S. Campbell1,
  2. S. Gonczy1,
  3. M. McNallan2 and
  4. A. Cox2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314876.ch44

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 4

How to Cite

Campbell, S., Gonczy, S., McNallan, M. and Cox, A. (2008) Performance of Blackglas™ Composites in 4000-Hour Oxidation Study, in Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314876.ch44

Author Information

  1. 1

    AlliedSignal Inc. P O Box 5016, Des Plaines, IL 60017-5016

  2. 2

    University of Illinois-Chicago, CEMM Dept, 842 West Taylor, Chicago, IL 60680

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1996

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375433

Online ISBN: 9780470314876

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Keywords:

  • flowing dry air;
  • 3-point flexure analysis;
  • original flexure strength;
  • optical microscopy;
  • microcracks

Summary

The effect of long term (4000 hour) oxidation on the mechanical properties of Blackglas™-Nitrided Nextel™ 312 Ceramic Matrix Composites in the temperature range of 500°–700°C was investigated. Flexure specimens of the title composites were prepared using three different pyrolysis processes were subjected to oxidation in flowing dry air at 500°, 600°C, and 700°C. Samples were removed at several different time intervals for 3-point flexure analysis. Results indicate that processing conditions had very little effect on the oxidation resistance of this system. At 600° and 700°C the mechanical properties degrade continuously to a steady value about half the original flexure strength. At 500°C, material properties initially improve then begin to slowly degrade. Optical microscopy indicates that oxidation of the matrix begins at the matrix/fiber interface and microcracks and proceeds into the bulk of the matrix.