Chapter 45. Strength of Fabric Reinforced Blackglas Composites

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Charles Lei and
  2. Frank K. Ko

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314876.ch45

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 4

How to Cite

Lei, C. and Ko, F. K. (1996) Strength of Fabric Reinforced Blackglas Composites, in Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314876.ch45

Author Information

  1. Fibrous Materials Research Center Department of Materials Engineering Drexel University Philadelphia, PA 19104

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1996

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375433

Online ISBN: 9780470314876

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Keywords:

  • brittle matrix composites;
  • matrix porosity;
  • fabric geometry model;
  • incremental strain;
  • strain energy

Summary

In brittle matrix composites the role of matrix porosity; interface; and matrix/fiber properties degradation due to processing are especially critical for the strength of the composite. In this paper, the Fabric Geometry Model (FGM) is modified to predict the strength of fabric composites. An incremental strain approach in conjunction with strain energy criterion is presented in order to account for the potentially nonlinear behavior of the materials, as seen in the experimental stress-strain curves of Nextel/Blackglas composites. The failure of the composite is determined by use of a modified maximum strain energy criterion, which is based on the relative magnitudes of the various energy terms in corresponding direction. The effects of porosity, microcracks, fiber and matrix degradation, and fiber/matrix interface are also considered in the modified model.