Chapter 48. Processing and Performance of SiC/Blackglas™ CFCCs using Filament Winding

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. M. N. Ghasemi Nejhad1,
  2. M. V. Chandramouli1 and
  3. A. A. Wereszczak2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314876.ch48

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 4

How to Cite

Nejhad, M. N. G., Chandramouli, M. V. and Wereszczak, A. A. (1996) Processing and Performance of SiC/Blackglas™ CFCCs using Filament Winding, in Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 17, Issue 4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314876.ch48

Author Information

  1. 1

    Advanced Materials Manufacturing Laboratory Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Hawaii at Manoa Honolulu, HI 96822

  2. 2

    HTML User Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1996

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375433

Online ISBN: 9780470314876

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Keywords:

  • infrared cure-on-the-fly;
  • carbon coating;
  • ceramic fiber;
  • scanning electron microscopy;
  • c-ring tests in air

Summary

Silicon carbide/silicon-carboxide (SiC/SiCO) Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) tubes with good quality have been manufactured using filament winding and preceramic polymer pyrolysis. The preceramic polymer used in this work is Blackglas™ (a siloxane polymer). A filament winding machine is designed to adapt to the brittle nature of the silicon carbide fibers and the relatively low temperature cure of the polymer. Seven reinfiltration/pyrolysis steps were necessary to reach a convergence by weight. CFCC parts have been successfully manufactured with processing times of about 8 days and densities of about 2.4 gm/cm3. Effects of infrared cure-on-the-fly and carbon coating of the ceramic fiber on the processing and performance of the manufactured CFCCs are studied, and is found that they greatly improve the quality and performance of the parts. Manufacturing guidelines for this processing technique are presented. The quality of manufactured parts were examined both microscopically and macroscopically. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to study the microstructure of the finished parts. Both room and high temperature C-ring tests in air were employed to assess the mechanical performance.