Chapter 10. Silicon Carbide for High-Temperature Heat Exchangers

  1. William Smothers
  1. R. A. Penty and
  2. J. W. Bjerklie

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470318140.ch10

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 1981 New England Section Topical Meeting on Nonoxide Ceramics: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 3, No. 1/2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 1981 New England Section Topical Meeting on Nonoxide Ceramics: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 3, No. 1/2

How to Cite

Penty, R. A. and Bjerklie, J. W. (1982) Silicon Carbide for High-Temperature Heat Exchangers, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 1981 New England Section Topical Meeting on Nonoxide Ceramics: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 3, No. 1/2 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470318140.ch10

Author Information

  1. Hague International, South Portland, Maine 04106

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1982

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470373934

Online ISBN: 9780470318140

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Keywords:

  • recuperators;
  • temperature;
  • combustion;
  • metallic;
  • temperature

Summary

Ceramic heat exchangers are now being used industrially in low-pressure applications such as recuperators and air preheaters. Serious consideration is being given also to ceramic materials for high-pressure heat exchangers. The basic advantage of using ceramic heat exchangers in the candidate applications is the potential for higher temperature service or increased life over that obtainable with metallic heat exchangers. Silicon carbide-based materials are now in service in many applications. The use of low-pressure ceramic recuperators constructed of silicon carbide has demonstrated fuel savings of over 40% in high-temperature industrial furnaces. The demonstrated lifetime of some silicon carbide tubes is 12 to 15 months at a material temperature of 1375°C. This paper discusses the availability of silicon carbide materials and the properties required for designing reliable heat exchangers. The usual failure mode encountered in the field is also discussed.