Chapter 8. Silicon Carbide Mirrors for High-Power Applications

  1. William Smothers
  1. Peter Z. Takacs

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470318140.ch8

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 1981 New England Section Topical Meeting on Nonoxide Ceramics: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 3, No. 1/2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 1981 New England Section Topical Meeting on Nonoxide Ceramics: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 3, No. 1/2

How to Cite

Takacs, P. Z. (2008) Silicon Carbide Mirrors for High-Power Applications, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 1981 New England Section Topical Meeting on Nonoxide Ceramics: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 3, No. 1/2 (ed W. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470318140.ch8

Author Information

  1. Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York 11973

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1982

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470373934

Online ISBN: 9780470318140

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Keywords:

  • irradiation;
  • magnetic;
  • plexity;
  • vacuum;
  • radiation

Summary

The advent of synchrotron radiation (SR) sources and high-energy lasers (HEL) in recent years has brought about the need for optical materials that can withstand the harsh operating conditions in such devices. SR mirrors must be ultrahigh vacuum compatible, must withstand intense X-ray irradiation without surface damage, must maintain surface figure under thermal loading, and must be capable of being polished to an extremely smooth surf ace finish. Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide in combination with sintered substrate material meets these requirements and offers additional benefits as well. It is an extremely hard material and can be cleaned and recoated many times without degradation of the surf ace finish, thereby prolonging the lifetime of expensive optical components. It is an extremely strong material and may be reduced in weight unlike conventional mirror materials. It is, however, a relatively new optical material–few opticians have experience in polishing it and few manufacturers have experience in producing optical quality coatings. Samples of different types of CVD coatings were obtained and polished to determine which type of CVD material results in the best surface finish. Results of our evaluation to date are presented, along with speculation on future uses of SiC as a mirror material for high-power applications. along with speculation on future uses of SiC as a mirror material for high power applications.