Chapter 20. A Ceramic Nozzle for the NASA-Langley 2.4-M (8.0-FT) High Temperature Structures Tunnel

  1. William J. Smothers
  1. John D. Buckley and
  2. Pete Vasquez

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470318782.ch20

Proceedings of the 6th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 3, Issue 9/10

Proceedings of the 6th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 3, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Buckley, J. D. and Vasquez, P. (2008) A Ceramic Nozzle for the NASA-Langley 2.4-M (8.0-FT) High Temperature Structures Tunnel, in Proceedings of the 6th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 3, Issue 9/10 (ed W. J. Smothers), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470318782.ch20

Author Information

  1. NASA-Langley Research Center Hampton, VA 23665

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1982

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470373972

Online ISBN: 9780470318782

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Keywords:

  • reclaimed enamels;
  • utilizing;
  • reclaim;
  • resmelt;
  • combination

Summary

Two materials, a refractory castable ceramic and a SiO2-SiO2 composite, were fabricated as nozzle inserts for the Langley Research Center's 2.4-m (8.0-ft) high temperature structures tunnel. The high pressure and intense heat of the CH4-air products of the combustion-gas stream limits the materials that can be used in this tunnel. The castable-ceramic material showed good resistance to erosion and the thermal loads imposed on it by the gas stream but failed in tension when subjected to high hoop stresses. The SiO2-SiO2-composite nozzle insert withstood the thermomechanical loads but eroded unacceptable with increasing test temperature and pressure.